With these tricks, you will save more money and waste less food

Being locked down at home, we started noticing a lot of bad habits and unacceptable behaviors that we perhaps didn’t pay attention to in the past. One of the most important mistakes that most of us do is wasting food. Indeed, about 47% of food waste in Canada takes place at homes. What we should all keep in mind is that the food we waste is food we are paying for, so why not use it all up? Below are some simple tricks that you can follow to abandon this bad habit and save more money.

  1. Clean your fridge before doing your weekly groceries. Use what you have left of vegetables to make a delicious soup or a tasty pizza, so you don’t end up with veggies waste.
  2. While consuming food, adopt the FIFO regime, which means Fist in First out. Place the new grocery items at the back of the fridge and put the older ones in the front, so as you can take up the old ones before the new ones.
  3. Make a meal plan with the ingredients that you have on the fridge that are about to expire before purchasing additional products.
  4. Once in the grocery store, make sure you only buy quantities that will be needed. For example, if you want to do a potato-based meal, take four potatoes instead of grabbing a 3 kilograms bag.
  5. Privilege smaller cartoon sizes for milk, as most of us, end up with spoiled milk at the end of the week. When you purchase big size cartons, you often use only half of it (if not less) and put it back in the fridge, which with time gets spoiled if not used.
  6. Cut ripe bananas and freeze them in a sealed re-sealable bag with other components to be used to make tasty smoothies.
  7. Cook in large quantities, consume what you need and freeze the rest for busy days when you won’t have enough time to cook.
  8. Cut bread leftovers into small slices and freeze them. These can be toasted and used afterward to make sandwiches for example.

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